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the construction o f a cafe in the west garden of the academy of sciences in golden gate park. >> supervisor mar? >> thank you, president chiu, i want to acknowledge that it's been a pleasure working on this, the staff of the california academy of science and is we have with this the general manager and kevin, monalele that have been wonderful to work with. the academy of sciences is beginning tomorrow, it is the season for science exhibit, but this is a project that is a low profiled structure which includes a cafe, it isn't really an expansion of the site but replacement of a temporary structure with a perm nept and attractive building, it allows us to see this sculpture that's hanging like floating like a cloud above it, it's called where land meets the sea and it will be much more visible with this new structure. the project will enrich the experience hosting the academy which lists countless families, not only from district 1 but throughout the city, i want to thank the land use submit tee for its unanimous support of this. i'll be out there tomorrow for the opening oftys the season for sci
much this is happening in san francisco. we know at the academy of science. i think that that the science is pretty clear folks speak it the science this is a scientific reality. so we' so we're looking at the offer lap especially in the regulating agrees we are going to need help and some kind of data and assistance if the goal is to address folks are going to what-do-you-call-it - there's a word called mail >> stamps. they're doing sentences with butterflies in it. i think it's important this is a process. i think 20e7b9d we're setting a process we're going to need some board support. and i think we can get there. this is a stationmaster of doing that. so i support with sxhoits is doing but, of course, we want to hear from the public first unless there's any more comments from the commission >> you know sometimes it's not what you do but how you do it. i like to finish it if wasn't for the restocking of those reservoirs you wouldn't be able to fish in some of those places. as a kid i'm a bonus lover so i'm the kind of person you know don't kill it i'll take it out
that increasingly powerful scientific explanations of natural regularities, what we call science, provide progressively compelling evidence against the claims of revealed religion as such. so the more science explains, it is thought, the less room there is for god. this view turns out to be the result of contingent and often unknowingly held metaphysical assumptions with immediate -- medieval roots the historical significance of these assumptions became unexpectedly important starting in the 17th 17th century because of the ways in which controversy in the reformation era unintentionally marginalized theological discourse about god in the natural word. that leaves scientific and fifth sol cal discower discough of trying to talk about god. in chapter 2, the protestant reformation are analyzed as the two mores important and related means by which attempts were made to ground truth claims by those who rejected immediate evil christianant. thatthat's has unintended pleasurisms based on the bible and reason. impasses and the rear familiar -- reformation era helped -- but historically, and empi
journalistic science lacks reliable reference. of both popular and high literary culture to be the tumultuous commissioned of the virgin and modes of thought in the in antebellum period a and choreographed the three stretches completely. rather than read the the high renaissance to read those as burst by wide popular writing immediately with the perceived reality the results with the political point of view to reanimate the of the blind alley. and then the first instance with the social engagement of the practice but he does so while incorporating and modified critical forms. john browne did jacksonian america did each marked with the hard work of three big it always a pleasure to engage david on the page and each book richly informs the sense of their subjects collectively and david i am grateful for your work and a remarkable career that continues with undiminished vigor. thank you very much and i apologize for my departure. [applause] >> first things first congratulations i think the more remarkable thing that is beneath the amazon since it is 25 years ago you cannot have the willingness t
itself as a religion. on the other hand, builds itself a science. that's her scientology comes to. a technology that this is not really a pulley system. this is a step icepack guaranteed to succeed latter to spiritual unlike men. our ron hubbard had a perfect understanding of the human mind. if you follow these types, you will achieve a kind of enlightenment. god doesn't play a big role in scientology. there's a place for him. eight dynamics. i won't go into too much of the terminology. at the peak there's a place that's infinite, but not a clearly felt outlay. scientology will tell you you could be a southern baptist or jehovah's witnesses still be a scientologist. but a product that doesn't seem to be the case. people are urged away from other belief systems to be fully subscribers to scientology. >> he touched on the entertainers and you read a lot about that in the tabloids newspapers. i was wondering about their counterparts in the political scheme of things on both the national and state levels they are, how much influence do they have like the attorney general i think one t
again lagging in math, science, and reading. so how concerned should we be? there's a debate ahead. [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. with 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. yep. got all the cozies. [ grandma ] with n fedex one rate, i could ll a box and ship it r one flat rate. so i kn untilt was full. you'd be crazy not to. is tt nana? [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. simple, flat rate shipping with the reliability of fedex. >>> well, another mediocre showing for students in the program for national student assessments global education scores which ranked 15-year-olds from around the world in reading, science, and math. this year's results shows the u.s., once again, in the middle of the pact. we're back with dan henninger and kim strassel. how seriously should we take an international ranking like this? >> i think we should take it seriously. some people will say, look, we are in the middle. we didn't necess
, home to a science station and under it's de facto control. these strategic waters and rocks are claimed by beijing and seuol. >> south korea has asserted rights in the air above. >> translator: the new korean air space defense identification zone has been modified to be in line with the country's flight information region, which does not overlap with neighboring countries. this zone includes the air space over iado's waters. >> seuol's move comes two wheys after china's surprise extension of its air identification zone encroaching on those of south korea and japan. it overlaps that of japan. the government in seuol says it won't impose the new rule until december 15th, allowing for consultation with neighbors. we believe this will not significantly impact our relationships with china and with japan as we try to work for peace and cooperation in northeast asia. >> south korea's president discussed the plans with u.s. vice president joe biden during his visit last week. the u.s. state department has declared itself on the same page as seoul. china release truck driver pictures of militar
the simulation center, which is opening in january. >> sure. the simulation center is part of our health sciences complex where you look at where medicine is going. we are trying to really force all of the education around medicine to be patient centric and make everyone realize you need a team approach. that also involves looking at using technology, to teach people how to do things. the way i was trained where i had to do one and then observe one, do one and teach one. we now have simulation for everything. unbelievable in terms of the technology. whoa have a mannequin who will deliver baby, et cetera. so it's extremely high tech. and that summation center, in my opinion, would be best in the midatlantic area when we open it in january. >> that sounds fascinating. >> absolutely. >> a mannequin delivering a baby? >> that's absolutely right. >> physical plant, new dorms, new buildings going up. >> that's right. two new residence halls are going up. atmosphere on the campus and keep as many of our students on the campus. it helps with student life. that's going on. i think again it will be a state
reaching out to the next generation of scientists, here is a good example at the lawrence science berkeley, they are creating what they call an apollo moment for the next generation. there is also a documentary called back to the moon for good. showing the progress the teams made so far in order to get back to the moon in 2015. the document runs through the holidays. of course, that is a very cool exhibit. and brody brazil joins us. >> this story is almost impossible to tackle by itself, that is why we're here to digest and tackle it. it is a possible move back wards. we'll tell us what happened in the last 24 hours that might have been held from us, the public for the last six months. >>> and one of the best rivalries in the nfl kicks off. the 49ers to host the seahawks with lots of implications on the line tomorrow. plus, it could be the second to last game ever at the stick. a full preview coming up next. >>> well, the seahawks have already secured a spot in the nfl playoffs, but if they win at candle stick, they will also clinch the afc west. and they have a lot to play for as they try
'm a docent at the academy of sciences, and it's not easy to get to and i often drive as a result. this would not take any new wires, but suppose the 3 continued by turning onto california and going out and picking up riders of the 33 stanyan and going down to fulton and making a loop that the 21 does? you would net together about three different neighborhoods with several commercial areas and knit together union square, laurel village, et cetera and i think you would get other riders and maybe a very well-used line. [ applause ] >> thank you, next speaker. [ reading speakers' names ]. >> good afternoon. >> good afternoon. thank you so much. my name is dawn isaac and i live in glen park. this is concerning the proposed change in the 35 muni. i am here to speak out against basically adding a second bus on small, windy, diamond street. we already have the 52. i have a concern about the proposal to remove that route from the loop -- which serves -- as i have been told, many elderly and disabled people. i have been to three meetings and everyone i spoke to, especially those who liveded on di
theory, where in science, scientific method everything we know today will be over turned tomorrow and everything should be taken with a grain of salt. if you make this your paradigm that paradigm will change and it's a huge increase to the pharmaceutical industry. people that are on stat ins shouldn't be on them. yes, doctors will read the guidelines and say, now this doesn't matter, this matters. your age associated. what that is going to generate is more doctor visits and more pharmaceutical visits. people that take these stat ins, 30 percent of people get side effects and no shown benefit to the people taking the drugs that are now on the drugs. i'm pissed about these guidelines. i think that we are going to medicalize and put a lot of people in harms way that don't need to be. these are things that start in california and go nationally. i think we may want to take the point of view on how we think about these guidelines that are contrary to the guidelines themselves. i don't want every doctor to say that's what i'm going to do. because the medical journal came out and there is
to realize i'd indication is not a perfect science. it's an art. so, we're always going to be tinkering with it. one thing i would like to believe that every american agrees we ought to raise the standards, challenge our students to be the best in the world, because that's who they're competing with. then we have to make sure we measure. i agree wean overtest, and sometimes that's done. that's not good. but you got to keep score. i can't imagine the bcs bowl being played with the score board off and saying, we just want to have a good time and enjoy the game. keeping score is part over it. then accountability. if the results aren't there, kids are not learning, somebody has to pay with a job. that's the way it is. so all of those are important factors. great to have you here. >>> later in the show, we'll have the 12 days of obamacare. you don't want to miss that. but first, lots of people want to change the world. very few succeed. but nelson mandela did, and so did dr. martin luther king, jr. so what made these men true leaders? reverend king's niece will join me next to tell us. >> my
that gap between inter-academe beginning and science is certainly sunlight. [inaudible] >> -- i mean -- jan mark [inaudible] [inaudible] [laughter] [inaudible] merrimac >> i want to talk about this being about publishing. suppose you abolished the phd dissertation, which i think would be a great idea. save a lot of trees -- but about treason anymore. save a lot of cybersomething. most people publish dissertation never published another thing again. it's not the mark of being a scholar necessarily for being a teacher. not all of us are book writers. even great writers had their distances. 3000 word people, marathon runners, sprinters. but those are the good writers. it's our talent for that. it's not till that way you can be talented. the second set would be -- how should i put it, constraint unoriginality, liveliness, i see that as someone who's never published a peer-reviewed article. i have tried. >> to have to go into this a bit more quiet the mac you understand why. yet five, six, seven, 10. it is a being like a purÉe of me and. so that's my contribution to that part. >> maybe one more
the world, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 of reading, math, and science. randi weingarten says that that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other developed countries. hour.s just over one >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn to turn mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law form -- law firm for several years. she taught in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as a ft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging retweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the broadcast is over to give repor
. it will be okay. john: but this bad science is pushed in video by talented people. >> with you do something in a narrative form or a recognizable actress with a clever teme as you have said that looks like a horror movie and it is very effective. the people that flash the environmental agenda have a tremendous resource with celebrities who are willing to do this kind of video. john: americc's biggest environmental success is tracking for natural gas. in a day reduced america's cardinal put many celebrities like john lennon's wife and son trash it is don't frack my mother then the crowd follows. >> they do. powerfully they sway natalie their followers like when george clooney spotted off on global warming says something, it goes global. unlike the and on celebrities who cannot get the rd out quite as effectively. they are a great power. john: james hirsen. by the way ed begley, jr. said he either does conservation from his conservative father it was wrong to waste any resource. we also reached out to every actor about the hypocrisy but not one responded. hollywood makes millions selling stuf
of trouble. well the opposition continues at the age of science and government buildings with a deadline set by the government to be out expiring on tuesday on the delegation support for the opposition comes despite ukraine's prime minister according to outside interference to stall on simple chinese lead a delegation of condemning what they describe as russian pressure on the piano the protest is not set once again talks sunday with a positional devices but that's one million people or one of the ukraine. what a sentence on the capital. joining the european lawmakers was former georgian president the coyote saakashvili. he also voiced his support for the anti government protests from the stage in central kiev. and this from the same man who ordered the brutal crackdown on opposition rallies in his own country just two years ago. this is how those who wanted saakashvili to resign were treated there. the rt spoke to political commentator alexander new cross off about the tendency of some eu politicians to stand side by side with ukrainian opposition. he says it's simply unacceptable. my estim
and then expected to run early or start late networking events included the importance leven's like the science fair or the art show. kid rescheduled time to work out and see friends. fifth it even included time to create the next week's scheduled to people out of one half-hour slot and color-coded by category of work or kids impersonal and took the path of the refrigerator. the which filled me with the odd mixture of hope. i can do it all but not one moment to spare. on paper there was time for everything as long as nothing went wrong but of course, things did. lead car got a flat to of a friend called for a favored word though the water heater broca of flooded the floor with the isfahan happened it is like the butterfly yvette. is set off a chain of events setting awful whole schedule. but if one got sick all of us would then we would be stuck in the house missing sleep and school aaron to work in getting bored off of speeto cartoons. everything humanly possible. reject a legal titans. at the slightest hint of the cold idle doubt herbal remedies and homeopathic remedies that promise to boost abuse
a computer science school and dreams of opening up his only company. he's found his way here is determined to get back. most contain some good news for me it's been amazing experience first it was difficult to learn these things and then once you give yourself a chance. there's no reason for not working. according to latest figures fifty thousand new jobs will be available in digital industry in france by two thousand seventeen. mark evans joins me now in the cdo market didn't the springboard is the name of this particular project but then many other social initiatives around the country in what people are calling to me but it's right let me use one particular liking to camp called a simple sentiment which has beaten it was an incredible initiative taking place in more tied to the north of paris in a pan and add in the ninety third on nme which is to me historically viewed as being ready to be all and zach won a significant number of disenfranchised people. what event it is that's how it's being not just on this involves exist at medan the social demographics that vary on the represented i
of jazz. it is partly what drives my interest of science and technology. >> also being honored tonight actress shirley mcklain. the actress joined the cast of the popular briti british show n abbey. >> and rounding out the list, martina labroyo. but who will perform tonight is top secret. >> any surprises? >> it wouldn't be a surprise if i did. >> cnn washington. >> we will have to wait patiently. but congrats to the honorees. and among them shirley mcklain. in an hour she will be weighing in. we have much more an it starts right now. hello again, these stories topping the news this hour. temperatures across the u.s. plunge. what it means for your travel plans. and he was the star of a movie that has generated over $2 billion around the globe. today his fans gather for an unforgettable tribute. killing for the fun of it? that is what investigators say a newly wed couple did. we'll tell you who confessed.
. >> this is a new science. we're trying to step up and understand that. >> raji arasu is the chief technology officer. >> we know the buyers' buying patterns already. we're taking it to the next level by understanding the click rate. what they might intend to do. it is not about selling one ticket per second. >> interesting stuff. it has dramatically changed the ticket business. >> we all know about that. thank you, cory. payment power may be taking off. the marketplace is still the core of the company. how are they keeping their digital shopping business booming? that is next. ♪ >> welcome back to a special edition of "bloomberg west." i'm emily chang. while ebay's payments business is clearly booming, the core of the company is still in its ebay marketplace. as more retailers offer their own marketplace, how are they making their marketplace better? jon erlichman is back with more. >> you are right about that. the marketplace is more than half of the revenue. two thirds of the operating income. the guy who runs the business -- i found myself wondering what he was buying this holiday seaso
remember thinking in my head, huh, who is this guy? >> this is leo. as a kid, he was obsessed with science, astronomy, chemistry, physics, but became a father too soon. lost his job, then his home. >> at first, what did you think he wanted? >> i didn't think, you got the wrong guy. he said, hey, this may sound strange, i'm going to approach you with an offer. i'll give you $100 and you spend it however you want to or i'll present you with this new laptop and teach you how to code. instantly, i said in my mind, door number two. >> he would write code for hours, for days. on the banks of the hudson or in a corner nook in patrick's office. at night, patrick would go home and leo would go back outside. shelters just aren't his thing, which seem fine until winter blew in. how do you stay warm on those really bitter nights? >> a train station. loick tons of blankets. >> it's getting really cold. he's like, i'm good, man, let's keep going. >> see, patrick just wanted to get him employed and housed, but leo had other ideas. what did you want to do with this information he was teaching you? >> make
behavior? science has shown us we are better together. people change in community. >> in a group? >> in a group. the key to changing behavior is getting help from your friends. like the beatles song, little help from your friends. we got to do this plan with the healthy curriculum through the church where 12,000 people lost a quarter million pounds. >> in one year. >> in a year. they did it together and those who did it together lost twice as much weight as those who did it alone. eating real food, getting off the junk, moving more. the connection to build a better life. >> it really is a solution to health care crisis. ta's not going to happen from government policy but communities changing how they live and doing it together. >> i say ask not what your government can do for your health. ask what you can do for yourself for your health. i don't expect the government to make me healthy. they can't make me healthy. >> they can't make their own shop healthy. but i honor you and i recommend wholeheartedly the daniel plan. 40 days to a healthier life. dr. mark hyman and my friend. go
a vehicle. i know this looks like science-fiction. it's not. this is years away. drops the package. come and get your package. we can do half hour delivery -- >> half hour delivery? >> the notion of drones making deliveries to your door step which even bezos admits is years away was quickly launched into the media stratosphere. >> an eye opener on "60 minutes." may zone is work on delivery drones that would drop-off goods from their warehouses no humans involved. >> on this cyber monday the world's largest retailer say it's testing a wild new way to deliver small packages to your home. >> we were talking about amaz amazon's plan to deliver to new heights. >> it was unbelievable. the commentary on the media. it's group think in the media. always see from reporters repeating and tweeting. this was the same story on every network in the same angle. no one was taking this opportunity to talk about this great technology or other companies that actually have similar technology. it was all amazon, the same story. it's 27-year-olds gathering the news and repeating it. >> there was some good news
for computer skype tists and a leap for explorers and researchers. >>. >> i know it's meant for science, but it looks like it will be great to watch tv on. >> michael eaves will run down the big game. >> hundreds gather to mark a 33rd anniversary of nelson mandela's death. more when we return. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. an act of terror then a rush to justice for pan am flight 103. >> the eyes of the world will be on us. >> an investigation under scrutiny. >> it looks nothing like him. somebody's telling lies. >> this was a miscarriage of justice. >> did they get the wrong man? >> there's something else going on. >> a shocking documentary event begins with: the pan am bomber on al jazeera america presents. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with a quick look at the top stories. >> people across south africa and the world are honouring the legacy of nelson mandela. religious services are hold across the globe to remember one of the greatest leaders of our time. increasing tensions in asia
this. the two men about anything. his sacrifice and howell. he was committed to science people. above himself the market. i wanted to say and i'm not afraid of much less effort than it is the introduction of some i've seen in the top of the candy this will cut it away once again states the site and justice. ibm the vbac that's the point is that in themselves. celebrity the farmer has done to people whether there is no less true that the dead difference. don't walk on the test. the people of south africa will walk on the tape to measure that could undercut to you. it was not tested to ensure the new president are in need. it's tough to come to. seriously a lesson that we are after then i wanted to go back to the current situation on the continent especially in the central african republic their african troops there the french are sending troops to reports of terrible massacres there what is your reaction to the situation there. though its right side is quite sad that this new way to conflicts. tonight it's due to sectarian conflicts. next is dangerous it is indeed interesting but does
basically met at a science fair in london, the delegates, and met a young canadian women, 16. we met at the hospital. and i had taken a year off between high-school going to oxford. i would visitor. so i worked, you know, oddly enough in north london. oftentimes. to earn enough money to go and see her. i arrived in montreal in the early 1952. and then after a little while there was this huge continent beyond. so my parents dismayed when they learned about it, hitchhiking to vancouver. not a very long time, people were very nice. some dispatch. and then i decided to go and have a look at america. been fascinated by any english child, the cisco kid and champion and all of those kinds of programs. so i entered the united states. the time of blame in washington state. the first time i remember seeing , the incident as its i looked bewildered. stopped and picked me up. so would you like to come to seattle. that was the beginning of a series of unbelievable things which -- i visited every single state in the union, well, at least a lie, everyone in the continental u.s. i traveled -- i thin
, america scores 26th in math. 17th in reading and 21 in science. >> okay. it may be average in most areas, but it did rank near the top in spending at number five. >> yes. >> are we getting most bang for our buck here? >> so this is a little troubling. the report notes that spending does not necessarily correlate to higher scores. so the united states spends between the ages of 6 and 15 $115,000 per student. to put that in some context, the slovak republic has scores similar to ours, and they only spend $53,000. >> that's extraordinary when you think about how much we're spending and what we're getting. the importance of these findings, julia, put this into perspective. what does it say about our educational system, and should we be worried about those low math scores and the way we're coming in against everybody else on pretty much every other barometer? >> so it is a little bit concerning, but to put it in more context, the united states has never really done well on these sorts of international assessments. since the '60s and '70s, we've scored in the middle or bottom of international
ranking of students around the world, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 of reading, math, and science. randi weingarten says that that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other developed countries. hour.s just over one >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers.
% of teachers, we are talking about math, science, literacy -- embrace it. only two percent or three percent inc. it will lead to lower or worse results. others are not taking up position. when you have that embracing of a concept and teachers and administrators have had the time to look at what people want to emphasize, they are moving in the right direction. we have seen no movement to delay or abandon our common core. we need to hold ourselves accountable for success. >> it you think about the common core? what are the key strengths? is there anything about the implementation you are nervous about? >> there are fewer things but deeper. the ability to use those things we are learning successfully. whether it is in support of critical thinking or in mathematics being able to answer it promptly, i think that is the real strength. i think one-size-fits-all has not been working particularly well. we do it in the hopes that they will devote the rest of their lives to the education system. that was not working as well as it needed to on an international basis for the united states. we decided to go
provided by: [[ m maalele a annnonoununcece, meet selsun science. you're history. seselslsunun b blulue e itch. ggetets s toto t the root off and hydrates the scalp. seselslsunun b blulue itchy . >>> there's a video that was shot back in october of 2011 that is just now going viral . >>> a video that was shot and just know going viral and it is a gem. >> and this is jason mraz, and the beautiful lady there with him is alexandra jaret. >> he is playing one of his popular songs lucky. she is singing the song lucky with him and this all happened in los angeles. > >> alexandra had gone to see jason mrazperform and she was turned away because she was underage and will skewed to wait in the alley way and i hope he comes out and even better than just coming out and saying hello. ended up singing this entire song. and she is incompetence zanily talented. listen to the pipes on this girl. >> >> they sound amazing together. >> r mber i said this video just started going viral. people do have the story behind this particular . >>> remember, i said it started going viral and everyone is saying. when
called regenerative medicine which is almost like science fiction. regenerative medicine is when they take your cells and they grow a large number of them. and they then take 3-d printing in the most recent version, and they print out the organ you need. so if you need a kidney, they can print out a kidney. if you need a heart, they can print out a heart. the texas regenerative medicine institute is headed by a woman doctor whose specialty is growing hearts. and you'll see in a few years remember the young lady who had a hard time getting a lung transplant because she was too young and the bureaucratic rules didn't work? ten years from now, if we're smart, if we encourage this, ten years from now there'll be no waiting lines, because you won't transplant. you will replant yourself. and it turns out you don't reject you. so the net effect -- this is very important. what it means is you don't take any of those antirejection medicines. so you radically lower the cost, you dramatically increase the likelihood of success, you eliminate waiting lists. it's a different world. number one
. this is a science which is why i use the boxing terminology. if you're at home and you know, boxing is known as the sweet science. they could have posted this at 12 noon instead of 6:00 a.m. and gotten dramatically more people seeing it. >> a store owner in new jersey thinks they've done it, they need to do so much more. you have another example, holiday inn. what's this retweet that they did? >> this is my favorite thing to hate on. there are way too many businesses retweeting nice things being said about them. let me make this point once and for all. if you retweet something that's being said about you that's awesome, you are bragging. >> you also have a tip, avoid one-way conversations. again, sort of the bull horn effect. what do you mean by this? >> again, it's that blasting out. i mean, social media is about listening as well. it's customer service. i wrote this book to build a manual for all of the people who have small businesses, a lot of people who have young entrepreneurs budding. entrepreneurship is exploding. i wanted to tactically show them how to do it. if you're talking about
to see lyrics from jean grae, nas, a number of artists, along with works in the social sciences, talking about urban areas and cities. it's so important that we have those particular narratives, rhy rhymes, struggles represented. because we're really saying to young people, look, your world. we get it. we have been missing this. we haven't been talking about these things. you've kept this going. we now have generations who are talking about really hard issues, because hip hop won't let it go. >> and it validates the textual lyes of young people themselves as value to study. thank you all for being here. last week we put together a black feminism syllabus. i hope y'all will help me put together a hip hop syllabus we can share for our audience spop if folks are just beginning to think about hip hop as a subject, we'll put that together for you, nerdland. jean grae, marcy morgan, walter kimbrough, thank you so much. but amber rose johnson is not leaving yet. because when we come back, he's doing the footnote. hi honey, did you get the toaster cozy? yep. got all the cozies. [ grandma ] with
and not tap water was more science fiction. this week on tuesday, the house voted to extend that law. sorry. got a little teleprompter screw up here. i'm reading the same thing over and over again. but the -- it is on to the senate now, and what is -- what makes it so complicated in the senate is the fact that senators are basically -- some senators, particularly democratic senators, who are saying that the law doesn't go far enough as it is currently written. so the question now, the dilemma now, that the senate faces is do you pass this law, do you renew this law that was created in 1988, take the attention you can get on that for another ten years, or do you wage a fight, push a fight here, saying we want this law to go farther, we want new provisions in there that would make it impossible for guns that would be printed on the new 3d printers that are coming out, that would make it impossible for those guns to pass through airport security. so that is the dilemma that they are -- that they are facing. now to give you a little history and context for this, you have to go back to the last
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